SAB Members

Our SAB Members

Our SAB consists of scientific experts that provide valuable expertise and help us shape the future of next generation sequencing.
Adam Hall, PhD
Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Dr. Hall’s lab develops translational applications for nano- and microtechnologies, focusing on two key platforms: (1) solid-state nanopores, which the lab employs for a broad range of analyses at the single-molecule level including characterization of important biological sugars like hyaluronan and detection of nucleic acid biomarkers for cancer and infectious disease, and (2) 3D cell culture constructs integrated with microfluidic systems, which the lab uses to study cancer progression and develop ex vivo approaches to personalized medicine.
Prof. Adam R. Hall
Steven Boxer, PhD
Camille Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry
Department of Chemistry
Stanford University
Steven Boxer, PhD
Camille Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry
Department of Chemistry
Stanford University
His research interests are in biophysics: the interface of physical chemistry, biology and engineering. Topics of current interest include: electrostatics and dynamics in proteins; excited state dynamics of green fluorescent protein, especially split GFP, with applications in biotechnology; electron and energy transfer mechanisms in photosynthesis; and the fabrication of artificial systems to simulate, manipulate, and image biological membranes. He has served on the scientific advisory board of many start-ups in the general area of biotechnology, and as an advisor to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. He is an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Biophysical Society and the National Academy of Sciences.
Prof. Steven Boxer
His research interests are in biophysics: the interface of physical chemistry, biology and engineering. Topics of current interest include: electrostatics and dynamics in proteins; excited state dynamics of green fluorescent protein, especially split GFP, with applications in biotechnology; electron and energy transfer mechanisms in photosynthesis; and the fabrication of artificial systems to simulate, manipulate, and image biological membranes. He has served on the scientific advisory board of many start-ups in the general area of biotechnology, and as an advisor to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. He is an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Biophysical Society and the National Academy of Sciences.
Prof. Steven Boxer